EBLIP chat: Day 4 – origins

#blogjune Day 4: I share a brief outline of where the current EBLIP model came from and what we still don’t know too much about within our LIS professional context.

Transcript

G’day, welcome to this video series chatting about all things evidence-based library & information practice – what it is, where it came from, tips and tricks on how to get started and the challenges and opportunities with implementing evidence-based practice at an individual and also an organisational level.

In this video I thought I’d just briefly touch on where it all came from and where it started and that happened in the 90s when medical librarians caught on to evidence-based practice in the medicine profession and started to apply this model to their own professional practice.

It wasn’t until maybe early 2000s when those few early definitions were published that conversation really gained momentum and since then over the last couple of decades, there have been a number of studies that have sought to better understand the nuances and the influences and what it looks like within our own library and information science professional context.

There is still a lot that we don’t know, particularly how it happens and what it looks like at an organisational level and this is particularly important I think because now more than ever libraries are called upon to demonstrate their value and impact to their communities and also be seen to be better aligned, where services better aligned with the objectives and strategic directions of their parent organisations.

And so you know I think there are two distinguishing features of evidence-based practice within our own professional context as opposed to others and that is the types of evidence that is valued and applied in our professional practice and the second being how the dynamics around decision-making; how that happens at an organisational level.

Evidence based practice also happens in education and in government policy making as well so we are not the only profession that practices or has adopted evidence-based practice as a model for continuous improvement.

If you have any questions about evidence-based practice or there’s a particular aspect that you want me to touch on please do let me know in the comments or you can tweet me on Twitter @acrystelle. Until then, Cheers.

You can also view Day 4 (Origins) video here.

Catch Days 1, 2 and 3 here.

References

Koufogiannakis, D. & Brettle, A. (eds.) (2016). Being Evidence-Based in Library and Information Practice. Facet Publishing: London, UK.

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